Uplander Kennels
Creating Legends

"I often invite the dog owner to come by and help with the training. It is a great investment in both the dog and the owner/handler."

- Ugo Pennacchietti -

Frequently Asked Questions & Answers

  1. How soon should I start training my pup?
  2. My dog ranges too far! What can I do?
  3. Which is the best breed of pointing dog?
  4. How long does it take to fully train a finished pointing dog?
  5. Do you use electronic collars?

1) How soon should I start training my pup?

Answer: You should start training pup as soon as she/he arrives home. By "training" I mean you can teach pup her/his name, "come", and a whole multitude of useful things, as long as you can keep the process fun for pup. Romps afield are priceless! Pup gets to experience all manner of wildlife, and builds excitement as well as confidence outdoors.
It is without a doubt, advantageous to acquire a working pup in the spring over a fall pup in typical Ontario weather conditions.

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2) My dog ranges too far! What can I do?

Answer: More-often-than-not, this really means, I can trust "Ranger" when he's close, but once he ranges a bit, he bumps birds! What folk need to understand is that a pointing dog is supposed to bring you to birds, and not the other way around. Most often, hunters will dictate where "Ranger" should hunt. This is not the proper application for a pointing dog. If you have provided Ranger with the proper foundation training followed by development afield, he will learn where to look for birds. Your efforts to over-handle Ranger only serve to frustrate you, and confuse your dog. It also restricts your dog from learning where the birds really are! The most important issue here is that if your dog is properly trained, she/he will hold point whether it is at 10 yards (meters) or 100 yards (meters).

Yes, a dog can run too big. This can also be a case of not enough experience "hunting".

As I stated, I have hunted my trial dogs, and trialed my hunting dogs. This is not because of luck. This is because my dogs have learned the difference through experience.

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3) Which is the best breed of pointing dog?

Answer: Unfortunately or fortunately - depending on your slant on life, dogs are much like people in this regard. You can get great ones or not-so-great ones in various colours, sizes, or breeds. You must do your homework when picking a breed. Consider what the application of your dog will be (ie. predominantly pheasants/game farms, or grouse/woodcock, etc.). Consider what maintenance, housing, transportation details will be required. Always involve the whole family in your choice of breeds. It can pay huge dividends down the road... believe me.  I offer this to all prospective puppy buyers, "Do the proper research, be honest with yourself.  LASTLY visit the breeders."  Too many folk do this the other way around and end up with the wrong dog for......15 or so years!

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4) How long does it take to fully train a finished pointing dog?

Answer: My suggestion is that you ask your dog for the answer to this one. In all seriousness, dogs develop at different stages. Rarely are two dogs alike. It also depends on the amount of training put into the dog over a certain period of time. In some cases, dogs require time away from the academy (much like you and I). Then after a brief sabatical, they are ready and raring to get back at it. It can also vary based on the clients definition of what she/he expects of the dog. All-in-all, it can take time. Don't hesitate to ask on how your dog is progressing, and if it's convenient, make an appointment to stop by for a visit or demonstration. I often invite the dog owner to come by and help with the training. It is a great investment in both the dog and the owner/ handler.

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5) Do you use electronic collars?

Answer: Yes, I do, and if used as intended, they are much more humane than the methods of yesteryear. Properly used, a training collar will re-enforce the foundation training already invested in the dog. When utilized properly, it should be at a setting low enough to effect compliance from the dog, without noticeable discomfort. What is especially important, is that in certain applications, a training collar can save your dog's life. When you have the opportunity to see one used as it is intended, you will appreciate how useful they can be.  I may never or rarely activate a collar but in the event that we encounter coyotes, deer, etc. a collar could end up being better than insurance!

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